Tail-lobbing

An upside-down adult male orca hits his tail on the water surface

Tail-lobbing

Surfing Orca

An orca surfs in the wake of the orca research boat

Surfing Orca

Sunset, Bay of Islands

An adult male and a juvenile orca frolic at sunset

Sunset, Bay of Islands

Orca with Ray in Mouth

An orca holds a ray upside down in its mouth, in Whangarei Harbour

Orca with Ray in Mouth

Morgan

Looking out from her barren & tiny tank.  She needs our help so she can return to her family.

Morgan

Orca & Research Boat

New Zealand orca will often approach the research vessel, at times bringing their young with them.

Photo: Andy Light

Orca & Research Boat

Eye to Eye

Dr Visser enters the world of the orca to observe them – this sub-adult male lies next to her watching her click her fingers – who is watching who?

Photo: Brad Tate

Eye to Eye

Rakey-Cousteau

Dr Ingrid Visser cups water over the orca known as Rakey-Cousteau who was rescued after washing up on a stormy beach.

Photo: Carrie Vonderhaar, Ocean Futures Society

Rakey-Cousteau

Swimming with orca

Dr Ingrid Visser swims with orca in the wild to better understand their hunting behaviours.

Photo: Steve Hathaway

Swimming with orca

Nobby goes free

Dr Ingrid Visser guides in a digger bucket to make a channel for Nobby the orca to go free.

Photo: Jo Wixey

Nobby goes free

Calming youngster

Dr Ingrid Visser calms a young orca who became stranded in the Bay of Islands.  Requiring only a little help it was soon swimming with its mother.

Calming youngster

Orca Antarctica

The Orca Research Trust also conducts research in Antarctica.

Orca Antarctica

New Zealand Orca

The orca of New Zealand are known for hunting in shallow waters along the coastline.  If you sight any please call 0800 SEE ORCA (733 6722)

New Zealand Orca

Rescuing “Rudie”

“Rudie” an adult male orca stranded in 2004 and has been regularly resighted since his rescue.

Photo: Mike Cunningham, Northern Advocate

Rescuing “Rudie”

At around 47 years old, orca “A1″ still provides new information

The first orca to be catalogued in New Zealand is known officially as ‘NZ1’. She also has the nickname of ‘A1’, which results from an early alphanumeric system of cataloguing groups of orca and individuals within the group. The ‘A’ stands for the first group catalogued, and the ‘1’ indicates she was the first identified [...]

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Orca Research Trust NOMINATED

Dr Ingrid Visser and the Orca Research Trust have been nominated for the BiLLe Celebrity Challenge.  If we win the voting, the ORT will receive €25,000 which we can put towards research, education, the orca and all the work that the ORT does.  Your vote counts and your vote is the only way we will [...]

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